FCRA - Fair Credit Reporting Act

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The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) outlines specifically who can see your credit profile. Businesses must have a "legitimate business need," and a "permissible purpose," as stated in the federal law to obtain your credit file. Otherwise, only you, and only those who you give written permission, can access your credit files. Your neighbors, friends, co-workers, and even your family members cannot have access to your credit profile unless you authorize it. Some examples of those who can access your credit files are:


  • Credit grantors
  • Collection agencies
  • Insurance companies
  • Employers


Any company that receives a copy of your credit profile will be listed under the "Inquiry" section of your report.


The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is the federal law regulating credit reporting companies like Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. It has been in effect since 1971. A revised FCRA became effective October 1, 1997. This law protects consumers' rights, such as the right to review and contest information in their credit profiles. It also specifically defines who can access the information in a credit profile, and how you are notified of this activity.
 
NOTE: This page is for informational purposes only, and does not constitute legal advice.
 
For complete details - see http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/fcra.htm